Green’s Dictionary of Slang

dig out v.

[dig v.1 (2)]

1. (US) to leave, to depart.

[US]J.F. Kelly Humors of Falconbridge 384: Mad and furious, the young chaps made a general onslaught on the people present, who ‘dug out’ very quick [DA].
[UK]Besant & Rice Golden Butterfly II 82: I spent most of the dollars, and thought I had better dig out for a new location.
[UK]Kipling ‘Their Lawful Occasions Pt I’ in Traffics and Discoveries 119: The sooner he digs out in pursuance of Admiralty orders [...] the better pleased Commander Fasset will be.
[US]B.L. Bowen ‘Word-List From Western New York’ in DN III:vi 440: dig out, v. To start; to leave. ‘I guess I’d better be digging out for home.’.
[US]C. Mathewson Sec. Base Sloan xiii 183: Wayne circled and dug out for second [DA].
[US]C. Woofter ‘Dialect Words and Phrases from West-Central West Virginia’ in AS II:8 352: The men dug out in a hurry.
[US](con. 1860s) R. Bradford Kingdom Coming 192: Jest waitin’ for you to grow up and be a man, so’s I c’d dig out.
[US](con. 1910s) J. Thompson Heed the Thunder (1994) 12: And wasn’t it likely that he would have dug out or that the neighbor would have relented, anyway, in time?

2. to attempt to get something one desires.

[US]Current Sl. III:3 5: Dig . . . out, v. To try hard.

3. (Irish) to separate from.

[Ire]H. Leonard Out after Dark 29: What was all that about? [...] What ailed you? I thought you’d have to be dug out of him.

4. (US black) to have sexual intercourse.

[US]Ice Cube ‘Ghetto Bird’ [lyrics] By 2 AM I was diggin’ her out.
[US]L. Stavsky et al. A2Z 28/1: He be diggin’ her out under the boardwalk.

5. in trans. use of sense 1, to throw out.

[UK](con. 1980s) I. Welsh Skagboys 298: The girl on the desk stares at me like I’m a cunt, like she’s about to dig me out.

SE in slang uses

In phrases