Green’s Dictionary of Slang

fencing n.

[fence v. (1) + sfx -ing]

receiving or dealing in stolen goods; thus fencibles n., stolen goods.

[UK]Hue and Cry after Mercurius Democritus 8: The number of vicious Artists are unknown to the Mrs [i.e. Masters] and the Wardens of their own fencing Mobs [...] the life of which Company are High-way Pads, Glasiers, Shop-lifts, Fob-sylers [sic], instead of Bung -Tipers [sic] Bulkers,a nd some for the Mill, Budg and Snug.
[UK] ‘Cant Lang. of Thieves’ Monthly Mag. 7 Jan. n.p.: Fencing of Prads Selling of Horses.
[UK]W.T. Moncrieff Heart of London II i: craig: Aby Houndsditch. aby: Here. covey: Of the Rag Fair Fencibles.
[Aus]Bulletin (Sydney) 11 Apr. 12/1: The Herald doesn’t go so far as to say that Sir John Robertson is a ‘fence,’ but it says that ‘fencing’ is part of his system. Whether Sir John will answer through the Press or the law we cannot say, but – we await his answer.
[UK]V. Davis Phenomena in Crime 156: Bill [...] transacted his fencing via one man.
[US]E. Gilbert Vice Trap 57: This isn’t any pissy-ant fencing bit.
[UK]R. Cook Crust on its Uppers 41: A bit of rural screwing where the fencing came unstuck.
[UK]P. Fordham Inside the Und. 24: Technical know-how or special knowledge which helps with ‘fencing’.
[US]P. Hamill Deadly Piece 70: The cops think he’s been working with the Cubans in coke, shylocking and fencing, out in Brooklyn.

In compounds

fencing crib (n.) [crib n.1 (1)]

the shop, house or room from which a receiver operates.

[UK] ‘Slashing Costermonger’ in Cuckold’s Nest 11: I’ve made my sons quite gemmen, too, / And they’re such slashing men, sirs, / One of ’em keeps a fencing crib, / And two a bawdyken, sirs.
[UK](con. 1724) W.H. Ainsworth Jack Sheppard (1917) 249: It [i.e. a door] only leads to the fencing crib.
[US]‘Ned Buntline’ Mysteries and Miseries of N.Y. I 113: A ‘fencing crib,’ is a place where stolen goods are bought or hidden.
[US]Ladies’ Repository (N.Y.) Oct. VIII:37 316/1: Fencing Crib, The residence of a person who buys stolen property.
[UK]Leaves from Diary of Celebrated Burglar 84/2: Among the curiosities of Granny Dixon’s ‘fencing crib,’ we noticed a black hen, famous in its day for its shoplifting propensity.
[US]G.A. Brine letter 3 July in Ribton-Turner (1887) n.p.: It is there [i.e. criminal ‘padding-kens’] they dispose of their ill-gotten gains, for great numbers of them are regular ‘fencing-cribs’.
[UK]Dundee Courier (Scot.) 3 Nov. 7/5: It is there they dispose of their ill-gotten gains, for great numbers of them are regular ‘fencing cribs’.
[UK]E. Pugh Spoilers 256: It wasn’t from the Nottin’ Dale crib at all. None o’ the boys at the ken there knew nothing’ about it.
fencing cully (n.) [cully n.1 (5)]

a receiver and seller of stolen goods.

[UK]Head Eng. Rogue I 49: Fencing Cully, One that receives stollen goods.
[UK]Head Canting Academy (2nd edn).
[UK]B.E. Dict. Canting Crew n.p.: Fencing Cully c. a Broker, or Receiver of Stolen-goods.
[UK]A. Smith Lives of Most Notorious Highway-men, etc. (1926) (1926) 205: [...] Fencing cully, a broker or receiver of stolen goods.
[UK]New Canting Dict. [as cit. c.1698].
[UK]Bailey Universal Etym. Eng. Dict. [as cit. c.1698].
[UK]Scoundrel’s Dict. 14: A Receiver of stoln Goods – Fencing-cully.
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue (3rd edn).
[UK]J.H. Yoxall Rommany Stone 116: Shoplifts, cackling-coves, fencin’-cullies, spruce-prigs, basks, snudgers, jacks, an’ bloody-murderers — there wasn't a one in the Newgit Calendar as you couldn't nab.
fencing ken (n.) [ken n.1 (1)]

the shop, house or room from which a receiver operates.

[UK]A Newgate ex-prisoner A Warning for House-Keepers 4: Glasiers, are the right quarrel-pickers, they are a sort of cowardly thieves [...] very fearful of the least noise that is, so having got out, he makes all haste away to his fencing cins [sic], where he will brag of his bold attempt .
[UK]B.E. Dict. Canting Crew n.p.: Fencing Ken c. the Magazine, or Ware-house where Stolen-goods are secured.
[UK]A. Smith Lives of Most Notorious Highway-men, etc. (1926) 205: [as cit. c.1698].
[UK]New Canting Dict. [as cit. c.1698].
[UK]Bailey Universal Etym. Eng. Dict. [as cit. c.1698].
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
[UK]Lex. Balatronicum.
[UK]Egan Grose’s Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
[UK]G. Kent Modern Flash Dict.
[US]‘Ned Buntline’ Mysteries and Miseries of N.Y. I 38: His outside customers, many of whom were petty thieves [...] used his house as a fencing ken.
[UK]B.M. Carew Life and Adventures.