Green’s Dictionary of Slang

job v.1

[SE job, to pierce, to thrust something into]

1. to have sexual intercourse; thus jobbing, sexual intercourse.

[UK]Thersytes (1550) D i: Jynkyn Jacon that iobbed iolye Jone.
[UK]A. Ramsay Epistle to Lord Ramsay in Works (1848) II 326: And compliment them with a clap Which by oft jobbing grows a pox [F&H].
[UK]Burns Answer to a Poetical Epistle in Works (1842) 60/2: This leads me on, to tell for sport [...] Come hither, lad, an’ answer for’t, Ye’re blamed for jobbin’.
[US] in Randolph & Legman Ozark Folksongs and Folklore (1992) I 571: And when I fuck Hanner, I fuck ’er, God damn ’er! / I job her sweet ass in the ground.
[US]L. McMurtry Horseman, Pass By (1997) 117: He did it because he wanted to get her down and job it in her.
[US](con. 1940s) E. Thompson Tattoo (1977) 246: Buck was jobbing her with a fury that rocked the car.
[US]J. Wambaugh Finnegan’s Week 283: Let’s go git our knobs jobbed!

2. to hit, to beat up.

[UK]Bell’s Life in London 29 Apr. 3/1: Jem succeeded in jobbing him several times.
North Devon Jrnl 11 Dec. 3: Ned jobbed well with his left on Roche's mouth.
[UK]Era (London) 21 Jan. 11/3: Charley [...] jobbed him cruelly right and left, on the head.
[Aus]Bell’s Life in Sydney 10 Apr. 2/3: Ike [...] got a jobbing hit in return.
[Aus]Bell’s Life in Sydney 18 Nov. 2/4: [He] got severely jobbed on the snorter.
[UK](con. 1837) Fights for the Championship 356: This was followed by a heavy jobbing hit on the right ogle.
[UK]Sl. Dict. 204: Job [...] used as a verb, ‘I’ll job this here knife in your ribs.’.
[Aus]Bulletin (Sydney) 21 Mar. 17/1: He’d tell of boot-closers who’d hemmed him in / While he was thumping one, and mauled and mobbed him, / And then relate with joy – this child of sin – / How, one by one, he’d chewed ’em up and jobbed ’em.
[UK] ‘The Rocks Push Eisteddfod’ in Bird o’ Freedom (Sydney) in J. Murray Larrikins (1973) 88: Such a biffing push of biffers ne’er before were on that beach, / Such ‘chawing’ and such ‘jobbing’ and such ‘give ’em Bondi’ tricks.
[Aus]Bulletin (Sydney) 19 May 14/4: Left before breakfast, not wishing to express my feelings to the landlord, who thought he could fight, and would – the groom informed me – ‘job a bloke in the eye in half a jiff.’.
[Aus]L. Esson Woman Tamer in Ballades of Old Bohemia (1980) 64: You brought it on yourself, didn’t you. I don’t job women.
[Aus]Bulletin (Sydney) 5 Nov. 11/4: The defendant admitted to ‘shaping up’ to a man in Collin-street, but pleaded that the threatened party had bolted with his wife. [...] No legislation will ever wholly kill the ancient rite of ‘jobbing’ the co.-re.
[Aus]G.H. Lawson Dict. of Aus. Words And Terms [Internet] JOB, TO – To attack; to strike.
[Aus]Cusack & James Come in Spinner (1960) 332: A stocky airman made a swipe at Blue. ‘Job him one, Blue,’ Lofty called encouragingly.
[Aus]A. Buzo Norm and Ahmed (1973) 8: I apprehended him and jobbed him one.
[Aus]D. Ireland Burn 10: Mary won’t tell any copper, either. She’d sooner I jobbed her and laid her out.
[Aus]R.G. Barrett You Wouldn’t Be Dead for Quids (1989) 214: Norton had threatened to job him if he didn’t do what he said.
[US]S. King It (1987) 614: Whoever it was, he jobbed you good.
[Aus]B. Scott Banshee and Bullocky 29: ‘Ah, get blocked, yer whingein’ blanks, or I’ll job yers’ [...] which shut them up.

3. (drugs) to inject a narcotic; thus as n. an injection.

[US]E.E. Landy Underground Dict. (1972) 113: job off n. [...] Subcutaneous injection of a narcotic.
[US]ONDCP Street Terms 12: Jab/job — To inject a drug.

4. to harm, to injure.

[US]S. King Christine 24: Arnie had fallen off his bike [...] and had jobbed his leg pretty good.