Green’s Dictionary of Slang

lully n.1

also lally, lulley, lulleys
[? SE laundry or lilywhite]
(UK Und.)

1. wet or drying linen.

[UK]‘A Beggar I’ll Be’ in Farmer Musa Pedestris (1896) 27: For such pretty Pledges, as Lullies from hedges, / We are not in fear to be drawn upon Sledges.
[UK]J. Poulter Discoveries (1774) 40: Gipsies [...] are great Priggers of Lulley; that is, Linen.
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue n.p.: Lulleys, wet linen, (cant).
[UK]H.T. Potter New Dict. Cant (1795).
[UK]G. Andrewes Dict. Sl. and Cant.
[UK]Lex. Balatronicum n.p.: Lullies. Wet linen. Cant.
[UK]G. Kent Modern Flash Dict.
[UK]Flash Dict. in Sinks of London Laid Open.
[US]Matsell Vocabulum.

2. a shirt; thus dabble one’s lally v., to wash a shirt.

[UK]G. Parker Life’s Painter 157: Dabble your lally, wash your shirt.
[UK]G. Hangar Life, Adventures and Opinions II 60: Your flash-man, is [...] dorsing a darkey upon the queer roost with some other rum blowen, who is kind enough to dabble his lully in the morning whilst he lies in bed.
[UK]Hotten Sl. Dict.
[UK]J. Ware Passing Eng. of the Victorian Era.

In compounds

lully-prigger (n.) [prig v.2 (1)]

1. one who steals from washing lines or from wherever washing has been put out to dry.

[UK]J. Poulter Discoveries (1774) 40: They are great priggers of lully.
[UK]G. Parker View of Society II 144: Lully-Priggers. People who steal linen from hedges, get over walls and take the wet linen from the lines upon which laundresses hang it.
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue ms. additions n.p.: Lully priggers. Thieves who steal wet Linnen.
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue (3rd edn).
[UK]Lex. Balatronicum.
[UK]Sussex Advertiser 14 Apr. 4/3: [We] soon passed a long string of gaggers, priggers, Adam Tylers, fancy coves, autum [sic] morts, gammoners, sweetners, uprightmen, bully huffs, lully priggers, star gazers, and coves of all sorts.
[US]Matsell Vocabulum.
[UK]Hotten Sl. Dict.

2. a thief who catches and strips a child of its clothing.

[UK]H.T. Potter New Dict. Cant (1795) n.p.: lully-prigger the lowest and meanest order of thieves, who go about decoying little children to some bye-corner , and then rob them of their clothes.
[UK]G. Andrewes Dict. Sl. and Cant.
[UK]G. Kent Modern Flash Dict. 21: Lully priggers, the lowest order of thieves, who decoy children to some bye place and rob them of their clothes.
[UK]Flash Dict. in Sinks of London Laid Open [as cit. 1835].
[UK]Duncombe New and Improved Flash Dict.
lully-prigging (n.) (also lully-snow-prigging) [prig v.2 (1)]

(UK Und.) the theft of washing.

[UK]G. Parker Life’s Painter 140: moll: How do you work now? tolobon nan: O, upon the old slang, and sometimes a little lully-priging.
[UK]G. Hangar Life, Adventures and Opinions II 60: Various impositions, practised daily on the unwary [...] such as lully-prigging, dobbing the cant.
[UK]G. Andrewes Dict. Sl. and Cant n.p.: lully-snow-prigging stealing children’s wet linen off the hedges.
[UK]G. Kent Modern Flash Dict. 21: Lully snow prigging – stealing wet linen from hedges.
[UK]Flash Dict. in Sinks of London Laid Open [as cit. 1835].