Green’s Dictionary of Slang

million n.

[abbr. of SE phr. million to one]

a sure bet.

[UK]F. Norman in Vogue Oct. in Norman’s London (1969) 28: It’s a million that you’ll get a carpet the next morning and no larking about.
[UK]F. Norman in Daily Mail 18 May in Norman’s London (1969) 95: One thing which is a million is that he [i.e. a villain] is right for himself which is all that matters to him.
[UK]G.F. Newman You Flash Bastard 188: That was something Sneed could drop from a great height on the DS, and it would certainly get him busted out; but, then he would be a million to chuck some shit around, try and open up one or two of the safe ramps that Sneed had had through Rosi.

SE in slang uses

In compounds

million-dollar wound (n.) [equivalent to UK blighty one (see Blighty n.) in WWI ]

(US milit.) any wound that guarantees the victim a passage out of a war zone and back to the USA.

War Medicine 8 357: A ‘million dollar wound.’ A fracture of the femur or similar wound, which results in no permanent serious disability but leads to permanent removal from the battle.
[US](con. 1944) N. Mailer Naked and Dead 428: There ain’t a goddam place you can get a million-dollar wound that it don’t hurt.
[US]L. Heinemann Close Quarters (1987) 173: Ain’ that some shit? Dusted off an’ gone home witha million dollars wortha gunge on his pecker, all the way to Michael Reese Hospital.
[Aus]Hackforth & Sherman About Face (1991) 55: You just prayed for a clean wound [...] a million-dollar wound to get you home.

In phrases

feel like a million dollars (v.) (also feel like a million, ...million big ones, ...million bucks, ...million seeds)

(orig. US) to feel excellent, very cheerful, extremely well, in the best of spirits; thus taste like a million v., to taste very good.

Suburban Citizen (DC) 17 May 6/5: First Billionaire: You’re not looking very well this morning. Second Billionaire: No. I feel like thirty million dollars.
[US]Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) 20 Aug. 1/2: As the young man says he is feeling ‘like a million bucks’ there is no reason for parental worry.
[US]Eve. Missourian (Columbia, MO) 14 Sept. 2/2: It would improve the health [...] and make a persson feel like a million dollars.
[US]E. Hemingway letter 21 June in Baker Sel. Letters (1981) 164: I have been having a swell time [...] and feel like a million seeds.
[UK]Wodehouse Carry on, Jeeves 46: I had just climbed out from under the cold shower, feeling like a million dollars.
[US]R. Whitfield Green Ice (1988) 43: I had some oysters that tasted like a million.
[US]S. Kingsley Dead End Act II: gimpty: How are you feeling? kay: All right. And you? gimpty: Like a million dollars!
[US]E. Anderson Thieves Like Us (1999) 103: I feel like a million bucks.
[US]Time 17 Mar. 43: You’ll go home feeling like a million dollars, rested and refreshed as never before! [DA].
[US]Kerouac On The Road (1972) 96: I felt like a million dollars. I was adventuring in the crazy American night.
[US]G. Cuomo Among Thieves 232: He went out that day feeling like a million dollars.
[US]T. Thackrey Thief 291: I was feeling like a million bucks because the loot from the first score was in the same neighborhood.
[US]R. Price Ladies’ Man (1985) 143: I felt like a million big ones. [Ibid.] 210: I felt like a million bucks.
[US]C. Heath A-Team 2 (1984) 102: Feelin’ better? Are you kiddin’? I’m like a million bucks.
[UK]Flame : a Life on the Game 121: We added a full-length fox fur coat [...] I felt like a million dollars.
[US]Snoop Doggy Dogg ‘Lodi Dodi’ [lyrics] Now I’m fresh, dressed, like a million bucks.
[UK]Indep. Rev. 13 Oct. 8: I feel like a million dollars and I wonder where I have been all these years.
[US]T. Dorsey Atomic Lobster 166: ‘How do you feel?’ ‘Like a million.’.
gone a million (adj.) [? coined by the profligate John Scadden, Prime Minister of Western Australia, (1911–16)]

1. completely in love with.

[Aus]Sun. Times (Perth) 18 Nov. 4/7: [He] said in it that ‘the ’ole pot,’ meaning Stead, ‘was, in the langwidge of the push, gone a million on the tart in tights’.
[Aus]Bulletin (Sydney) 27 Aug. 40: [cartoon caption, ‘a clergyman addresseth a very badly injured tramp’] Proofs of Affection. / ‘You have certainly been unfortunate, my pooah friend; but remember the good Book says, “Whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth.”’ / ‘Struth, Mister, He must be gone a million on me!’.
[Aus]K.S. Prichard Haxby’s Circus 187: George, hugging his wife, exclaimed: ‘Lord, mum, if it weren’t for you, I’d be gone a million on the minx.’.

2. (Aus./N.Z.) in a hopeless state.

[Aus]Sun. Times (Perth) 8 Nov. 4/7: ’E gimme another bottle of champagne [...] an’ I’m gone a million.
[Aus]C.J. Dennis ‘The Battle of the Wazzir’ in Moods of Ginger Mick [unpub. unrevised proof version] Fer young Bill, wus gone a million, an’ ’e never guessed the game .
[Aus]G. Casey ‘Short Shift Saturday’ in Mann Coast to Coast 209: If they drop their bundles they’re gone a million.
[Aus]T.A.G. Hungerford Riverslake 197: He’s gone a million if the Bastard lamps him.
[Aus]‘Nino Culotta’ Gone Fishin’ 194: He says he’s a Fisheries Inspector, an’ ’e tells me I haven’t got a licence, an’ I got undersized fish, an’ I got an illegal net, an’ I’m gone a million.
[NZ]R. Morrieson Pallet on the Floor 75: You’re all gone a million.
G. Casey ‘Short-shrift Saturday’ in L. Hergenhan Aus. Short Story 97: If they drop their bundles they’re gone a million.
P. Barnes Luna Park Eclipses in New Theatre Qly (Cambridge) Aug. (1996) 205/1: jack: stone the crows and stiffen the lizard. alice: I’m gone a million, Jack, gone a million.
go over like a million bucks (v.)

to succeed absolutely, to do very well.

Printer’s Ink 141:1 70: Got something good for you this time. Just the thing in a knit traveling one-piece. Went over like a million dollars in our store in Seattle.
Proc. Kentucky Mining Instit. 119/2: We had an opening party and the miners brought their families and we had flowers, balloons, free beer and sandwiches and it went over like a million dollars.
Recreation 291: Reducing classes, too, go over like a million dollars. There is no trouble at all in selling a $15 ticket to a lady who is anxious to reduce.
Photoplay Treasury 211: The act went over like a million and when the weary little troupe went home at midnight, Big Sister Mary Jane carried their first pay envelope!
R.C. Reinhart History of Shadows 70: Well, my designs went over like a million dollars.
K. Schildroth ‘Wrestling at the Chase’ in St Louis Post-Dispatch [Internet] Sam wanted to put wrestling on TV. [...] It went over like a million bucks. Other promoters saw this on TV from around the country and it set the stage for the next 40 years.
look (like) a million dollars (v.) (also dress (up) like a million dollars, look (like) a million (bucks), ...million on a hoof)

1. (US) to be extremely attractive; extremely smartly/fashionably dressed.

[US]T.A. Dorgan in Zwilling TAD Lex. (1993) 54: Did you get that manager with the trick coat — looks like a million.
[US]G. Bowerman diary 5 May in Carnes Compensations of War (1983) 80: We saw some real honest to goodness American girls and they looked like a million dollars.
[US]F.S. Fitzgerald ‘Bernice Bobs Her Hair’ in Bodley Head Scott Fitzgerald V (1963) 97: If she looks like a million dollars she can talk about Russia, ping-pong or the League of Nations.
[US]T. Thursday ‘Art for Artie’ in Argosy All-Story 30 Dec. [Internet] They’re all dressed up like a million dollars.
[US]H.L. Wilson Professor How Could You! 273: He looks a million to me.
[US](con. 1900s–10s) Dos Passos 42nd Parallel in USA (1966) 144: Gee, you look like a million dollars.
[UK]P. Cheyney Dames Don’t Care (1960) 13: She’s got class an’ she dresses like a million dollars.
[US]D. Runyon ‘Social Error’ in Runyon on Broadway (1954) 454: Miss Harriet Mackyle may not look a million.
[US]C. Himes ‘With Malice Toward None’ in Coll. Stories (1990) 53: You’re looking well, you’re looking like a million.
[US]Good Housekeeping Dec. 259/1: I get some white paint and make Randy’s old ones look like a million dollars [DA].
[US]W.L. Gresham Nightmare Alley (1947) 122: Clothes that will make you look like a million bucks.
[US]F. Brown Dead Ringer 25: She looked like a million dollars in gold.
[Aus]Cusack & James Come in Spinner (1960) 269: Looks a million dollars to me.
[US]M. Spillane Long Wait (1954) 90: She was a million bucks in a green dress under artificial lights and two million in bed.
[UK]I, Mobster 40: They came in all tricked out like a million dollars.
[US](con. 1920s–30s) J.O. Killens Youngblood (1956) 438: The cracker was dressed up like a million dollars.
[UK]‘Charles Raven’ Und. Nights 87: It was driven by a woman who looked like ten million dollars.
[US]Larner & Tefferteller Addict in the Street (1966) 89: I look like a million dollars with a sun tan, and everything is great. I’m healthy again.
[US]K. Brasselle Cannibals 50: I spotted Jonathan. He looked like a million.
[US]T. Berger Sneaky People (1980) 210: Kid, you look like a million onna hoof.
[US]Cab Calloway Of Minnie the Moocher and Me 72: Man, we looked like a million dollars.
[US]R. De Christoforo Grease 145: We looked like a million bucks.
[US]A.K. Shulman On the Stroll 86: You look like a million.
[UK]M. Amis London Fields 372: Nicola looked like a million dollars. Or a million pounds, anyway.
[US]C. Hiaasen Native Tongue 12: The guy looked like a million bucks.
[UK]K. Sampson Powder 56: She’d look, quite sincerely, a million dollars.
[UK]Observer 9 Jan. 31: He could wear my granny’s old cardie and still look like a million dollars.
[UK]K. Sampson Killing Pool 61: By the time he gets the thing [i.e. a damaged car] back it will look like a million dollars.

2. other than in dress, to look impressive, e.g. as a sporting performer.

Pacific 58 18/1: If Long Beach ordains complete prohibition no one has a right to sell liquor, whether it is a beautiful hotel that looks like a million dollars or a drug store that looks like thirty cents.
[US]Day Book (Chicago) 7 Dec. n.p.: ‘Maquard always looked like a million dollars against us,’ said Manager Dean of the Phillies.
[US]Salt Lake Trib. (UT) 30 June 31/3: Zimmerman [...] looked like a million dollars to Gotham fandom on his recent tour with the Cubs.
million to a bit of dirt

a phr. used of a very sure bet.

[UK]J. Ware Passing Eng. of the Victorian Era 176/1: Million to a bit of dirt (Sporting, 1860). A sure bet requiring no caution. ‘It’s a million to a bit o’ dirt the Plunger pulls it off.’.