Green’s Dictionary of Slang

throttle n.

also thrattle-pipe
[northern UK dial.]

the throat.

[UK]Surrey Æneid iv. 361: Amid his throtal his voice likewise gan stick [L. vox faucibus hæsit, Douglas the voce stak in his hals] [OED].
[UK]R. Brome Northern Lasse III iii: Stir but a foot sirrah, or utter but a sillable and I’le cut your thrattle-pipe.
[UK]New Canting Dict. n.p.: throttle the Throat, or Gullet; He seiz’d his Throttle: i.e. He took him by the Throat.
[UK]Bailey Universal Etym. Eng. Dict. [as cit. 1725].
[UK]Bridges Homer Travestie (1764) I 82: Your hides to save: let Hector swagger, / And in your throttles sheath his dagger.
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
[UK]Bridges Burlesque Homer (4th edn) II 50: He hem’d, to make his throttle clear.
[UK]C. Dibdin Yngr Spectre Knight 15: He’d empty a flask down his throttle.
[Ire]‘A Real Paddy’ Real Life in Ireland 32: They talked [...] till the two-and-ninepenny piece was melted down their throttles.
[US]W.H. Williams Wreck I iii: Come along, Mr. Gogmagog [...] you’ll have the colelywabbleums in your throttle.
[Ire] ‘Tippling Paddy Flannagan’ Dublin Comic Songster 178: For whiskey’s my deadliest foe, / When down my throttle I shove it.
[UK]Kendal Mercury 17 Apr. 6/1: To moisten his throttle it vas his delight.
[US] ‘I Likes A Drop Of Good Beer’ in I. Beadle Comic and Sentimental Song Bk 47: And, like my thirsty father, / My throttle’s always dry.
[UK]Cythera’s Hymnal 37: His throttle / No liquor swallowed but Tokay.
[Aus]Truth (Sydney) 4 Mar. 1/8: Hullo! old cock. Come and shove some of this down your blanky throttle.
[UK]C. Rook Hooligan Nights 26: My muvver comes along and catches me by the throttle.
[UK]M. Marshall Travels of Tramp-Royal 274: Dutchy! [...] open out the throttle! Ready!
R. Service ‘A Snifter’ in Rhymes for my Rags 206: So I say ’tis malted milk / I’ll be skoffin’; / Sooth my throttle sleek as silk.

In compounds

throttle-juice (n.)

(Aus.) alcohol.

[Aus]Sun. Times (Perth) 10 July 4/7: These brands of throttle juice / Will knock you blind and bandy.

In phrases

wash one’s throttle (v.)

to have a drink.

[UK]Annals of Sporting 1 May 362/1: Go clean your ivories and wash your throttles, for I’m sure you must need it.