Green’s Dictionary of Slang

sore adj.1

(mainly US) angry, irritated.

Greenock Advertiser 15 June 4/1: ‘“Bunt” was sore on him [...] for he had put him away twice before [...] in the jug. Sent him up’.
[US](con. c.1840) ‘Mark Twain’ Huckleberry Finn 44: The judge he felt kind of sore.
[Aus]Bulletin (Sydney) 24 Oct. 11/2: Woof, a Gloucestershire trundler, takes liberties with batsmen sometimes and Lancashire cricketers are naturally ‘sore’ with Lord ’Arris for putting away their man, while the Southern professional is allowed to hurl the ball in whatever manner suits him best.
[US]Ade Fables in Sl. (1902) 91: Of course Zoroaster and Zendavesta were very sore at having their Act killed.
[US]H. Green Actors’ Boarding House (1906) 72: I’m good an’ sore at Phil an’ that wife of his.
[UK]Pelham & Rule [perf. Kate Carney] Good morning Mr Postman [lyrics] Have you brought any letters for me? / [...] / If you haven’t got one then I shall feel very sore.
[US]J. Lait ‘Charlie the Wolf’ in Beef, Iron and Wine (1917) 56: He’ll come out sore. Even if he’s paroled he’ll be sore.
[US]Van Vechten Nigger Heaven 86: You’re not sore on account of anything you’ve heard about Ronnie?
[US]D. Lamson We Who Are About to Die 202: If you [...] start waving dough in their faces they get sore.
[Ire]‘Flann O’Brien’ At Swim-Two-Birds 130: I declare to God I am sick sore and tired telling him to stop in at night and do his lessons.
[US]I. Shulman Amboy Dukes 42: You’re not sore at me?
[US](con. 1944) L. Giovannitti Prisoners of Combine D 119: You say what’s on your mind and when you’re sore you show it.
[UK]G. Lambert Inside Daisy Clover (1966) 15: The cop got sore and accused her of making fun of him.
[US]L. Rosten Dear ‘Herm’ 278: I was very sore at you.
[US]J. Wambaugh Glitter Dome (1982) 169: They were still sore about having the murder case taken away from them.
[UK]Indep. Rev. 1 June 1: My heart is very sore. I had hoped the court would punish this man.
[UK]Guardian Guide 29 Jan.–4 Feb. 59: A nerdy Jew, sore at ‘taking a dive’ for Fiennes’ clean-cut Wasp action.

In phrases

sore as...

(orig. Aus.) very angry, annoyed, in various comparative phrs., incl. sore as a boil, …boiled owl, …gum boil, …pup, sore as sox, sorer than a mashed thumb.

[US]S.E. White Blazed Trail 38: Sore as a boil, ain’t he!
[US]L. Chevalier ‘Getting into Society’ Variety Stage Eng. Plays [Internet] I’m as sore as a woman with a swell complexion an’ four ripe pimples on her beak!
[UK]E. Pugh City Of The World 265: The people o’ the neighbourhood have already been pretty well skun out, as the saying is, and are feeling about as sore over it as a Bank ’Oliday donkey’s back.
[US]R.W. Brown ‘Word-List From Western Indiana’ in DN III:viii 590: sore as a boiled owl, adj. phr. Very angry.
[US]‘Commander’ Clear the Decks! 113: The flag loot was up first, sore as sox that his hoist had gone.
[UK]A.N. Depew Gunner Depew 67: Every man was sore as a boil when we got back.
[US]T.H. Kelly What Outfit, Buddy? 44: Course O’Rourke was sore as a boil.
[US]H.W. Brecht Downfall 255: Zeideman’s sore as a pup.
[US]J.T. Farrell ‘A Practical Joke’ in Short Stories (1937) 182: She got sore as a boil and wouldn’t go.
[US]W. Smitter F.O.B. Detroit 99: Herman was sorer than a mashed thumb. And he took it out on Russ.
[US]J. Jones From Here to Eternity (1998) 574: I’m sore as a boil, and I feel about as popular as a dildoe in a virgins’ convent.
[UK]Wodehouse Jeeves in the Offing 27: She would, as you say, be as sore as a gum-boil.
[US](con. WWII) J.O. Killens And Then We Heard The Thunder (1964) 59: You’re going to be as sore as a boil in the morning.

SE in slang uses

In compounds

soreback (n.) [the supposed hospitality of Virginians, an attitude that is underlined by their constantly slapping one another’s backs in camaraderie]

(US) a native of Virginia.

WA4MJF ‘Mid Atlantic RACES Coordination Net – 60 meter’ posting 1 Oct. on eHam.net [Internet] Since I’m a soreback, I know that RACES in the Commonwealth of Virginia is now a private non-profit corporation and NOT the RACES that the government has that is covered in Part 97.
sorefoot (n.)

a derog. term for an British Asian.

[UK]R. Puxley Fresh Rabbit 61: In normal slang an Asian is known among other things as a ‘sorefoot’.
sore hand (n.) [resemblance to a cut hand]

(Ulster) a very thick sandwich of bread and jam.

[Ire]Share Slanguage.

In phrases

dressed up like a sore finger/thumb/toe (adj.)

see under dressed adj.

have a sore eye (v.) [one’s eyes weep with laughter]

(US Und.) to have a good time.

[US]A. Greene Glance at N.Y. II iii: I’m bound to take her to Waxhall to-night; we’re goin’ up to have a sore eye there.
stick out like a sore thumb (v.)

see separate entry.