Green’s Dictionary of Slang

hack v.2

[SE hack, to chop]

1. (also hack off, hell-hack) to irritate, to annoy.

[US]J.C. Harris Uncle Remus and Friends 349: When you once git ’em hacked dey er hacked fer good; dey des give right up en roll der eyes [DA].
[US]Sat. Eve. Post 3 July 6: Gosh, it hacks me! [HDAS].
H. Kephart ‘A Word-List From The Mountains Of Western North Carolina’ in DN IV vi 413: hack, v. To annoy; nettle. ‘That joke hacks Steve to this day.’.
[US]A.C. Inman 22 Apr. diary in Aaron (1985) 201: This being looked upon by people as an invalid [...] has hacked me.
[US]Z.N. Hurston Jonah’s Gourd Vine (1995) 43: You ain’t nothin’ and ain’t got nothin’ but whut God give uh billy-goat, and then round tryin’ tuh hell-hack folks! Tryin’ tuh kill somebody wid talk. [Ibid.] 66: Mama, yuh been hell-hackin’ me eve’y since us tole yuh us wuz gointer git married.
[US]Randolph & Wilson Down in the Holler 156: Hack and wad are transitive verbs that mean pretty much the same as bore.
[US]J. Blake letter 15 May in Joint (1972) 173: What really hacked me was his bland assumption that I would be stupid enough to allow him to move all the Heat he had collected into my vicinity.
[US]Current Sl. V:4 12: Hack . . . off, v. To irritate or anger.
[US]C. Hiaasen Tourist Season (1987) 289: It’s his attitude that hacks me off.
J. Waller Twisted Mile 47: I’m more than certain that he’s hacked off at us.

2. (US campus) to tease gently.

[US]J.W. Carr ‘Words from Northwest Arkansas’ in DN III:i 82: hack, v. To embarrass. ‘He was hacked’.
[US]Da Bomb [Internet] 14: Hack: To playfully tease.

3. (orig. computing) to tinker with a computer system for pleasure and as a proof of one’s expertise.

[[US] minute of Tech Model Railroad Club of M.I.T 5 Apr. cited on ADS-L 16 June 2005 [Internet] Mr. Eccles requests that anyone working or hacking on the electrical system turn the power off to avoid fuse blowing].
Partisan Rev. 42 241: The compulsive programmer spends all the time he can working on one of his big projects. ‘Working’ is not the word he uses; he calls what he does ‘hacking’ .
[US]A. Naiman Computer Dict. 68: This week I’m hacking the terminal driver [HDAS].

4. (orig. computing) to gain unauthorized access to a computer system (and poss. use that access for illegal activities).

[US]N.Y. Times 28 Aug. IV 20: Hackers...wouldn’t...think of calling up on the telephone and saying, ‘Hi, I’m a bright young guy and I’d like to hack your computer’ .
L.A. Times Mag. 12 Sept. 24: He hacked Pacific Bell computers to obtain ‘unpublished telephone numbers for the Soviet Consulate’ .

5. se sense 3 or 4 but with systems other than computers.

[UK]Observer (London) 15 May 42/1: ‘Cloud chasing’ [...] involvd tricks such as blowing smoke rings [...] Skilled vapers can ‘hack’ their devices to change the size of the vapour clouds they emit.