Green’s Dictionary of Slang

bowman adj.

[? Fr. beau, good-looking]

good, excellent, first-rate, a general positive; often as all’s bowman, everything is in order.

[UK]B.E. Dict. Canting Crew n.p.: Then we’ll pike, tis all Bowman, c. we will be gone, all is well, the Coast is clear.
[UK](con. 1710–25) Tyburn Chronicle II in Groom (1999) xxviii: All’s Bowman All is safe.
[UK](con. 1715) W.H. Ainsworth Jack Sheppard 68: All’s bowman, my covey. Fear nothing.

In compounds

bowman ken (n.) (also Ken Bowman) [ken n.1 (1)] (UK Und.)

1. a house considered worth robbing.

[UK]B.E. Dict. Canting Crew.
[UK]A. Smith Lives of Most Notorious Highway-men, etc. (1926) 207: A bob, or boman-ken, i.e., a good or well furnished house, full of booty, worth robbing.
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
[UK]Lex. Balatronicum.
[UK]Egan Grose’s Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
[UK]Flash Dict. in Sinks of London Laid Open 112: Ken Bowman, a well-furnished house.

2. a house occupied by thieves.

[UK]B.E. Dict. Canting Crew.
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
[UK]Lex. Balatronicum.
[UK]Egan Grose’s Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
bowman-prig (n.) (also beauman-prig, boman-prig) [prig n.1 ]

a first-rate thief.

[UK]C. Hitchin Conduct of Receivers and Thief-Takers 13: Those three young Lads, altho’ they are young, yet they are Boman Prigs, and as such go on the lay call’d the Dub.
[UK]T. Walker The Quaker’s Opera II i: At St. Martins, St Giles’, we shall have Burial still, / And here the Bowman Prig stands Buff, / And the Pimps have miss’d their Will.
[UK](con. 1710–25) Tyburn Chronicle II in Groom (1999) xxviii: A Bowman Prig A bold or dext’rous Thief a sure Rogue.
[UK]Whole Art of Thieving n.p.: A boman prig A bold or dexterous thief.
[UK] ‘The Bowman Prigg’s Farewell’ in Wardroper (1995) 283: Here’s health to the beauman prigs, / From the rum pad down to the prancer.