Green’s Dictionary of Slang

la-di-da(h) adj.

also laa-dee-laa, la-de-da(h), la-dee-da, lah-de-dah, lah-di-dah, lar-de-dar, lardy-da, law-de-dah, lawdeedaw
[? lardy-dardy adj.; or the supposed excl. of La-di-dah! in the face of information, experience etc.]

1. stuck up, arrogant, snobbish.

[UK]London & Provincial Entr’acte 15 Oct. 3/1: I stayed at the bar, / And found there close on twenty Pro’s, / Some far from lardydah. / [...] it seemed that they of cash were rather low’.
[US]Louisiana Democrat 14 Feb. 1/6: Lah-De-Dah. Was there ever a more remarkable creature than the young man of to-day? He is a study’.
[UK]Leamington Spa Courier 27 Feb. 8/4: A character song by Mr. C.P. Oakly, ‘Captain Ladidah’.
[Aus]‘John Miller’ Workingman’s Paradise 104: If he came any of his law-de-dah squatter funny business on me I’d give him the straight wire.
[Aus]Truth (Sydney) 18 Feb. 7/3: Quite a number of lah-di-dah Neutral Bay residents object to the establishment of a penny ferry to that salubrious suburb.
[UK] ‘’Arry on Harry’ in Punch 24 Aug. 90/1: ’E bangs Boernerges to bittocks, this lar-de-dar bagman — in silk.
E. Pugh Harry’ The Cockney 279: And stopping out all night! And highty-tighty and la-di-da to your own mother.
J. London Valley o f the Moon (1914) 58: Remember that lah-de-dah bookkeeper rummy?
[UK]Leigh & Arthurs [perf. Marie Lloyd] A little of what you fancy does you good [lyrics] But a drop of stout’s supposed to make you fat / And there’s many a lar-di-dar-di madam doesn’t dare to touch it.
[US]P. Kyne Cappy Ricks 248: Just look at the difference between him and these la-di-da boys that never had any hard knocks!
[US]C. Sandburg letter 17 Apr. in Mitgang (1968) 158: I’ll grant there’s a lah-de-dah angle to the guy.
[Ire]Joyce Ulysses 39: Would you like a bite of something? None of your damned lawdeedaw airs here; the rich of a rasher fried with herring?
[US]O.O. McIntyre White Light Nights 139: It was in a la-de-dah Fifth Avenue soda-fountain where theater crowds go in evening dress.
[UK]N. Jacob Man Who Found Himself (1952) 73: Proper la-di-da chap ’e wear an’ all.
[UK]P. Hamilton To The Public Danger 53: fred: You like ’em in that class, don’t you Nan? nan: What class? fred: Oh — cars an’ lah-di-dah voice, an’ what not.
[UK]C. Harris Three-Ha’Pence to the Angel 128: ’E ’adn’t no time for ’im. All la-di-da.
[UK]Derby Dly Teleg. 21 July 4/2: He’s — well, you know the type — all la-di-dah [...] has a television set.
[UK]J. Curtis Look Long Upon a Monkey 84: Here was one of Ray’s enemies, a lahdidah, jumped up, snotty-nosed cowson, defenceless. Good enough! Smashing chance to put in the slipper.
[UK]S. Selvon Lonely Londoners 124: The cruder you are the more the gielas like you you can’t put on any English accent for them or play ladeda or tell them studying medcine in Oxford.
[UK](con. c.1918) D. Holman-Hunt My Grandmothers and I (1987) 19: ’Ark at you, all la-di-da!
[US]B. Hecht Gaily, Gaily 98: Swan’s lah-de-dah voice stopped me.
[UK]P. Fordham Inside the Und. 37: He had got over what he called my la-di-da accent.
[US]R. Campbell Alice in La-La Land (1999) 79: She’s trying to act la-defucking-da, as though she’s a queen and I’m some scumbag.
A. Burgess Little Wilson 13: Southerns [...] were not well regarded in brutish Lancashire [...] They spoke lahdy dah.
[UK]J. Healy Streets Above Us (1991) 43: This mob down here. All lah-di-lah, posh voices.
[UK]Guardian G2 11 June 10: A la-di-da pair of Moroccan-style beaded slippers.
[US]T. Udo Vatican Bloodbath 80: Mr fucken lardy fucken da little Lord fucken Fauntleroy fucken college boy faggot.
[UK]J.J. Connolly Layer Cake 51: The mother’s changed the family name back to the original la-dee-da double-barrelled affair.
[UK]Indep. Mag. 12 May 62: I’ve done The Beggar’s Opera and all these laa-dee-laa West End shows.
[US]Mad mag. Dec. 35: That’s just because he went off to la-di-da college.
[UK]H. Mantel Beyond Black 209: Oh, la-di-da.
[Aus]L. Redhead Thrill City [ebook] Show up at things [...] and act all la-di-da like a successful female author.

2. effeminate, affected.

[UK]Lanarks. Upper Ward Examiner 12 Dec. 4/6: A tall, well-made Engishman [...] whose face was of a soft ‘spoonyism’ type. He had a regular la-de-dah manner.
[UK] ‘’Arry on Arrius’ in Punch 26 Dec. 302/2: There isn’t a hignerant mug [...] Who ’as learned ’ow to garsp hout a He-haw! in regular la-di-dah style / But’ll look down on ‘’Arry the haitchless’.
[UK] in Punch 14 Feb. 84: The female ’art you think you’ll mash, / By sporting stick-up collars and a la-di-da moustache.
[UK]H.G. Wells Kipps (1952) 171: I don’t want no gells in the place larfin’ at me '...] sniggerin’ and larfin’ and prancin’ and traipesin’ lardy da!
[Aus]H. Lawson ‘Grandfather’s Courtship’ in Roderick (1972) 860: He hated dictionary or ‘la-di-dah’ words, but used one or two now and then when he wanted to be impressive.
[UK]D.L. Sayers Have His Carcase 117: You know the sort, all la-di-dah and snake-skin shoes.
[US]L. Berg Prison Nurse (1964) 42: He minced off, passing a manicured hand through his marcelled hair. Michaels waved his hand after him, la-de-da fashion.
[UK]C. Harris Three-Ha’Pence to the Angel 53: Sometimes a friend o’ mine, she gives me la-di-da cigarettes, gold tips and a smell like a chorus girl in pink packets.
[UK]D. Lytton Goddam White Man 98: They were all dressed up like whites and they tried to talk la-de-da like whites.
[UK]John Cooper Clarke ‘Beasley Street’ [lyrics] Yellow socks and a pink cravat, nothing la-di-da.
[Aus]M.B. ‘Chopper’ Read How to Shoot Friends 61: A la de da gentleman minced up to me and asked me the time.
[Ire]P. Howard Miseducation of Ross O’Carroll-Kelly (2004) 122: Up on stage, roysh, it’s all lah-de-dah, the whole song-and-dance routine.
[UK]Observer 1 Feb. 33/2: A well-run campaign can engage online communities without any fashionable, Obama-style brains or la-di-dah Obama-style blarney.
[UK]Sun. Times Mag. 19 Dec. 63/3: A street-fighting lawyer who may his way up by graft - la-di-da law degree.