Green’s Dictionary of Slang

cold one n.2

also cold pup
[orig. a conscious euph. for a cold beer, used during Prohibition (1920–33) when it was better not to mention alcohol in any form]
(orig. US)

1. a bottle (latterly can) of beer.

B. Fisher Mutt & Jeff 6 Apr. [synd. cartoon] A salad, French peas, fried spuds and a tall cold one.
[US]J.E. Rendinell diary 16 July in One Man’s War (1928) 142: Tell Bill to save me a few cold ones.
[US]Ade Hand-made Fables 65: He put the Town so Dry that even a Stranger had some trouble in finding a Cold One lying on a piece of ice.
[US]J. Conroy Disinherited 220: Let’s go over to Adolf’s and lap up a few cold ones.
[Aus]‘Nino Culotta’ Gone Fishin’ 22: He won’ go crook if we put a cold one in his hand, will he?
[US]D. Ponicsan Cinderella Liberty 101: It’s five o’clock Friday. I’m goin’ to have a few cold ones.
[US]J. Ellroy Brown’s Requiem 185: You wouldn’t catch me on a golf course without a six pack of cold ones.
[US]B. Hamper Rivethead (1992) 141: When it’s all over there will be several tall cold ones aimed right for the gullet.
[US]Eble Campus Sl. Apr. 2: cold pup – beer.
[Aus]Bug (Aus.) 29 June [Internet] We were celebrating the drafting of the sub-culture’s practices over a cold one at our local tittie bar.
[US]T. Dorsey Atomic Lobster 116: Coleman poured another cold one into his funnel.
[Aus]N. Cummins Adventures of the Honey Badger [ebook] Other than a meat pie, a cold one and the touch of a fine woman, there’s nothing better than a good massage.

2. a cold drink.

[US]R. Chandler Long Good-Bye 186: But I mixed a tall cold one this time and sat in an easy-chair.