Green’s Dictionary of Slang

gee n.2

also G
[gee (up) v. (1)]

1. (Aus., also gee-er, gee man) one who ‘gees up’ the potential customers into a sideshow, strip-club, confidence trick etc.

[Aus]Stephens & O’Brien Materials for a Dict. of Aus. Sl. [unpub. ms.] 78: GEES: slang sharpers confederates: the men who pretend to buy from or bet with cheap-jacks or swindling gamesters.
[Aus]Sydney Sportsman (Surry Hills, NSW) 2 Jan. 4/1: Passing through the cordon ‘gees’ that surrounded the three-card men.
[US]Little Falls Herald (MN) 31 Mar. 3/3: How to Operate the Shell Game with Profit [...] If the ‘gee’ springs a fat roll, tip the ollie a finif to vamp until the blow off.
Lone Hand (Aus.) 1 Nov. 57/2: When a ‘mug’ is caught, the —’G’s’ (who are got up to represent farmers, clerics, or any citizens commonly supposed to know little of cards) commence their manoeuvres.
[Aus]Bulletin (Sydney) 14 Nov. 2/4: In one business block in Melbourne there are four ‘dummy’ auctioneers. They all sell the same class of shoddy and have the same ‘gee-ers’. [...] The runners-up or ‘gee-ers’ are all well-known confidence and three-card men. [...] In the bogus auction rooms they act the parts of jewellers and dealers, and keep a look out for mugs who are fleeced for the auctioneer, and later on skinned for the crook’s own benefit, if their hides are worth the trouble.
[UK]Aberdeen Jrnl 19 Dec. 8/4: ‘Ricks’ and ‘gees’ were members of the gang who mixed with the crowd, and ‘enticed the fly to walk into a web.’ To ‘sting the gee’ meant to take part in the swindle.
[UK]‘George Orwell’ Down and Out in Complete Works I (1986) 176: These (omitting the ones that everyone knows) are some of the cant words now used in London: [...] A gee (or jee – it is pronounced jee) – the accomplice of a cheapjack, who stimulates trade by pretending to buy something.
[Aus]K. Tennant Battlers 141: In the show world a ‘gee-man’ or ‘micky finn’ was socially on the level of a duck’s feet. He is the man who goes out in the crowd and touts for custom.
[UK]D.P. Mannix Sword-Swallower 62: That gee’s a grind man who thinks he’s a talker.

2. idle chatter, empty talk, ‘blarney’.

[Aus]Sydney Sportsman (Surry Hills, NSW) 17 Oct. 1/3: Another Tommy, by way of a gee, said it was a dead head ticket for a tea fight.
[UK]J. Curtis Gilt Kid 18: It’s only gee. They just talk that way to make you turn milky.

In phrases

put in the gee (v.)

to deceive, to ‘tell the tale’.

[UK]J. Curtis They Drive by Night 105: If I come unstuck, pretend you know nothing about it. Just put in the gee.
put on the gee (v.)

to boast, to brag, to ‘swank about’.

[UK]J. Curtis Gilt Kid 20: It was O.K., he thought, Curly had dough on the level and was not just putting on the gee.
sling the gee (v.)

(UK Und.) to take part in a swindle.

[UK]Gloucester Citizen 19 Dec. 7/3: Their lordships now knew all about ‘gazoophing the sarkers,’ [sic] ‘Smitzing the bogey,’ ‘Slinging the gee’.
[UK]Aberdeen Jrnl 19 Dec. 8/4: ‘Ricks’ and ‘gees’ were members of the gang who mixed with the crowd, and ‘enticed the fly to walk into a web.’ To ‘sting the gee’ [sic] meant to take part in the swindle.