Green’s Dictionary of Slang

prig v.1

[SE prick, to urge a horse forward]

1. to ride; thus prigger n., a rider.

[UK]Harman Caveat for Common Cursetours in Viles & Furnivall (1907) 84: to prygge to ryde.
[UK]Groundworke of Conny-catching A3(b): Hee pryg a praunce, he byng a wast into the darkemans.
[UK]Dekker Canters Dict. Eng. Villainies (8th edn) n.p.: prigging, Riding.
[UK]Head Eng. Rogue I 51: Prigg, To Ride.
[UK]Head Canting Academy (2nd edn).
[UK]R. Holme Academy of Armory Ch. iii item 68c: Canting Terms used by Beggars, Vagabonds, Cheaters, Cripples and Bedlams. [...] Prigg, to Ride. prigging, riding.
[UK]B.E. Dict. Canting Crew.
[UK]Scoundrel’s Dict. 19: Riders – Prigers.
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
[UK]Lex. Balatronicum.
[UK]Egan Grose’s Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
[US]Boston Satirist (MA) 21 Oct. n.p.: Gently o’er the meadows prigging, / Jean and Colin took their way.

2. to have sexual intercourse [i.e. ride v. (1a), but note prick v.1 ].

[UK]Dekker Canting Song O per se O O2: From thy stampers then remove thy drawers and lets prig in sport.
[UK]Dekker Canting Song in Eng. Villainies (8th edn) O2: [as cit. 1612].
[UK] ‘The Rogues . . . praise of his Stroling Mort’ Head Canting Academy (1674) 20: [as cit. 1612].
[UK]Grose Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.
[UK]Lex. Balatronicum.
[UK]Egan Grose’s Classical Dict. of the Vulgar Tongue.